Tuesday, June 28News That Matters

Danish Protest Pig: Features, Characteristics, Protection And More

The Danish Protest Pig or Danish Resistance Pig is a rare breed of domestic pig that, due to its red and white color, has two lines that separate the colors and has a white horizontal belt that resembles the colors of the Flag of Denmark. . It originated in North Friesland, in the south of Schleswig, at the beginning of the 20th century, when the Danes living in the area were not allowed to raise the Danish flag and keep and display the protest pig, making it a symbol of their cultural identity.

Like most other European pig breeds, the Danish protest pig is active and very hardy, and the breed is currently rare. This breed of pig became a symbol of Danish cultural identity due to its red color, its wide white vertical belt, and a trace with a white horizontal belt that resembles the colors of the Danish flag.

Danish Protest pig history and origin

The Danish protest pig, red pig, or Danish pig is a rare and threatened breed of domestic or free-range pig. The animals are red in color with a wide white transverse band. The coloring is reminiscent of the Danish flag and has grown since the early 20th century, when Danes living in North Frisia were forbidden to hang the Danish flag, hence the breed’s name.

This breed is known for its colored stripes, pigs of this type have a characteristic red color, with a white vertical belt and a white horizontal belt. At full maturity, males usually weigh up to 350 kilograms or more, and females up to 300 kilograms. The average height of the animal is 92 centimeters and the breed was first officially recognized as a breed in 1954.

Characteristics

The Danish Protestant pig is a medium to the large-sized animal. It is primarily red in color with a broad white vertical band and a trace of a white horizontal band. The Danish protest pig has an average height of about 92 centimeters. Mature boars have a weight that could be more than 350 kilograms, and the average live weight of mature sows is around 300 kilograms.

Classification

After the Duchy War, Schleswig-Holstein annexed Prussia in 1864 and the Danes were forbidden to display their flag colors, red and white. The idea of ​​raising a red and white pig is emerging and this population of pigs is even called “husumer protest pig” or protest pig, and also the original husumer because it was raised around the town of Husum.

It is said that it comes from the local populations of Holstein and Jutland, mixed with the English Tamworth breed. Later the Angler Sattelschwein breed was used. The breed was made official in 1954.

Behavior

Protest pigs are very active and calm-tempered. They are suitable for those who want to start a pig farming business, that is for beginning breeders, although they are currently rare breeds. Pigs are tough and robust, and they also have the ability to withstand different climates. However, they tend to do well in the native climate.

Distribution

It has its origin in North Frisia, in the south of Schleswig, at the beginning of the 20th century, when Danes living in the area under Prussian rule were forbidden to raise the Danish flag and instead displayed the Protest Pig. Due to its red color, its wide white vertical belt, and a horizontal white belt stroke that resembles the colors of the Danish flag, it became a symbol of its cultural identity.

The breed reaches a height of 36 inches and weighs up to 355 kilograms. It was likely created from swamps from the Holstein and Jutland swamps, the English Tamworth pig, and the red variants could be from the Angeln Saddleback pig. It was recognized as a breed in 1954, but after the last birth in 1968, the breed was considered extinct.

Reproduction

Sows of this class of pigs are very fertile and tend to give birth to a good number of piglets. They are ideal breeds to start commercial pork production. Unfortunately, the breed is on the way to extinction, but there is no accurate data yet.

Pigs tend to grow rapidly as they are known to have developed as a result of crossing pigs from the Holstein and Jutland swamps, the English Tamworth pig, and the red variants are believed to have come from Angeln Saddleback pigs.

Protection

When pigs matching the breed’s phenotype were rediscovered in 1984, followers and new breeding communities began to emerge. Since 1996, there is a community that is responsible for protecting this kind of pig, which grants official permission to breed.

In particular, Danish protest pigs are raised in zoos in Berlin, Hannover, Kiel, and Gelsenkirchen, as well as in other cities. The state of Schleswig-Holstein officially encourages and contributes to the breeding and maintenance of the breed, even if it is not a historical breed, but a breed that has cultural value. This breed is considered today in Germany as an endangered breed.

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